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September 7, 2012#

Email Marketing and Strategy

Choosing a Service
ESP’s (Email Service Providers) are a dime a dozen these days. They range from full-service firms like ExactTarget & Silverpop to extremely cost-efficient (but limiting) do-it-yourself services like Constant Contact. Here are some important factors that should effect your decision on choosing a provider:

  • Size of your list(s)
  • Desired frequency of mailing
  • Design & Programming Resources
  • Your budget

Testing Strategies Customize, Personalize, Optimize
Testing your email marketing is easy as pie and there are many great ways that you can test and optimize your campaigns. A few of these strategies include:

  • Subject line testing (A/B split)
  • Dynamic Content testing
  • Offer placement
  • Image choices
  • Teaser vs. a lot of content

We have experience managing dozens of campaigns for our clients and would love to bring this insight to your brand. If you seek strategy consultation or design expertise, Contact Us now so we can help you optimize your campaigns.

September 4, 2012#

How to Find a Dependable Graphic Design Provider Today

Graphic Design is used for businesses in all types of applications. Corporate Graphic Design uses range widely, from use in marketing strategies and tools to generating and managing customer relations. A quality Graphic Design studio can very easily be found by going on the web.

You will often be able to find a Graphic Design studio that is willing to do a multitude of tasks – web design, sales collateral, some even provide good copywriting. These are great for help a creative vision and a message to resonate with your audience, to keep your marketing efforts current. Another common form of a Graphic Design is a contractor employee, or freelancer, that can be brought in occasion to address minor needs such as updating content on the company website or completing an email marketing campaign. The flexibility found in contract Graphic Designer are excellent for those that need a seasoned communication design expert that may be applied in several ways.

Once you have a clearer sense of the exact graphic design tool that you need, you should think about the quantity of design your business requires. Make certain that you get your design in the right volume so that you have continuity throughout your communication tools and you can save money on these purchases at all times. When you have a good volume of communication design solutions, you will never have to worry about running out of communication tools often required to run your business properly.

All of these issues will be handled for you by a dependable design expert. Graphic Design should be purchased from a business that has a long history of being a reputable business, so spend the time needed to seek one of these out. Even if you are inexperienced with hiring a Graphic Design studio, you can go online to do your research and gain some vital knowledge about the types of design you require and how it can be applied at your business. Correspond with a dependable design business to get the design support that your team needs at a price that is fair so that you can afford to use these wonderful tools.

June 1, 2012#

Letter from the President – June 2012

Dear Member:

I am writing to announce the election of Sarah Burns as the new AIGA Upstate New York President. Sarah has a strong history of work with our chapter and has an unwavering commitment to its success. Please join me in congratulating Sarah and supporting her, along with the entire new board, in the coming months and years. We’re fortunate to have very smart and dedicated volunteers who will continue to work hard to keep our chapter vibrant and perhaps most important, a place where stimulating and inspirational thinking about design occurs.

Sarah will officially become President on July 1st and will be available via e-mail at president@upstatenewyork.aiga.org.

For those of you who would like to update your records, I can be reached at cgoldann(at)cg-design.com.

Again, I wish Sarah great success and congratulate her on her election.

Remember, AIGA is what we make of it. Stay involved. See you at the next AIGA Upstate New York event.

Sincerely,
Chris Goldan
President Ex Officio
AIGA Upstate New York

May 1, 2012#

Letter from the President – May 2012

Dear colleagues,

It doesn’t seem all that long ago that I first became a member of AIGA. It was 2001 and I had been working a designer for six years in Baltimore. My boss received regular communications from AIGA and AIGA Baltimore — well-designed snail-mail goodness. I remember attending my first AIGA Baltimore event — Pulp, Ink, and Hops — an annually celebration of design, paper, printing, and beer. I also remember leaving the event wanting more — to be a part of this community that cared about our craft, supporting each other’s challenges and celebrating each other’s accomplishments. I knew then, as I do now, that AIGA nurtures designers.

Over the years, through good and bad economic times, AIGA was there, providing me with inspiration, guidance, and knowledge. AIGA conferences, competitions, publications, and seminars provided me with a source of inspiration and a sense of community. It became a place to meet people who shared my passion for design. Safe to say I was drinking the AIGA Kool-Aid.

Then things changed. AIGA became predictable: the same people, attending the same events, talking about the same issues, year after year. Even the well-designed snail-mail goodness was replaced by emails. I considered myself an active member in good standing, paid my dues on time, and attended half of the events throughout the year. Why was AIGA starting to feel stale? Why were they cutting services? What initiatives were they working on for us? Where was the design profession going? Why wasn’t I feeling nurtured? Was there still value in my membership?

Nearly a decade later, I began to think about the responsibilities and role of chapter president. Having served on the AIGA Upstate New York board for two years, these questions weren’t new to me. They did, however, take on new meaning and priority in light of the chapter’s geographical, social, economical, and technical challenges. During the past two years I’ve found that these challenges continually alter HOW we manage and execute WHAT we do. With that perspective, I’d like to share what I’ve learned about us, over the past two years.

How are we doing?

We’re doing well, thanks to active members and a collection of sturdy volunteers. In 2010, the board of directors embraced a pretty big idea — managing a chapter that nurtured events throughout the state. We regularly exceed our affiliation requirements, holding more than four events a year. We’ve introduced three new programs (Portfolio Workshop, Portfolio Review, SPARK mentor program) and a great design competition.

As a community, we are more diverse than ever in our backgrounds, training, practice, and ages. But our community is also fractured by geography, and despite our size and numbers, we have not been able to leverage this insight. What can we do to make sure we learn from each other and make the chapter better, for us?

Do the math

Say we have 240+ members scattered across New York. If a quarter of those members are active, that’s 60 members total. Then suppose we have six active cities where members have stepped up to nurture their local design community — that’s 10 active members per hub. Then let’s assume one active member in each hub is willing to volunteer. Is it fair to expect one person to nurture an entire local community? Simply put, your AIGA experience is directly related to your level of involvement — it is what you make it.

Due to the geographic challenges faced by our chapter, our board has been willing to support programming held throughout the state, a concept most members take for granted. Other chapters base their events in one city: AIGA Minnesota travels to Minneapolis; AIGA Wisconsin travel to Madison. To be a member is to be involved: Whose responsibility is it to bring AIGA to Ithaca — your president’s or yours?

The chapter has anticipated and shaped its own change. We have found ways to make sure we are ready to play when the next big idea comes. But the question is: will members play a new role in the chapter’s future?

My career to date was perhaps a dress rehearsal for my role as chapter president. But nothing prepared me to serve. There were decisions with which you agreed and disagreed. I trust that you will provide our next president with constructive suggestions on how to make the experience and the value of membership better.

I encourage you to give these statements some thought and send me suggestions. I will work with chapter leadership and the AIGA national staff to make sure our AIGA is an institution that helps us build on our past, make our present relevant, and make the future a place that we define, together.

Yours,
Chris

April 1, 2012#

Letter from the President – April 2012

2:00 minutes left on the clock…. you are wiped out…. and awaiting graduation.

I recently heard a professor declare “we have everything we need to find our students jobs in New York City”. While this sounds very bold, I disagree. Yes, some colleges have the ability to carry on the task of finding student jobs, but more times than not, students enter the extra-ordinary task of finding themselves a job on their own, after graduation. Students are saying (again) to those who will stop and listen that they are in need of something more than instruction and a proprietary college portfolio. And that call to “something more” hasn’t changed or gone away in the year since I first wrote this letter. Which is why I am re-publishing it here.

Dear Graduating Graphic Design Students,

I appreciate you have had a considerable amount of feedback in the development and completion of your portfolio. However, at this point, it’s not what you know, but who you know, and who they know.

Assuming your ultimate goal is to gain employment following graduation, your main reasons for attending the AIGA Portfolio Reviews next Thursday are as follows:

  • Network with professionals;
  • have a potential employer become familiar with your work;
  • practice your interview skills; and,
  • get valuable feedback from professionals. That feedback can be on issues ranging from how best to present your portfolio to whom that person knows in New York City.

Worry less about whether the professional reviewing your portfolio works here in Rochester or in NYC. Worry more about learning whom that person knows. Many of the professionals participating in AIGA’s portfolio review have hundreds of connects along the east coast, not to mention throughout AIGA. Wouldn’t it be nice to have access to those contacts? Professionals are more likely to vouch for graduate they know well, and history shows students who participate in AIGA events build relationships with professionals who are willing to work on their behalf.

It’s not too late. Make the most of your time at the upcoming portfolio review and other events, meet as many people as possible, take business cards or copies of your resume, and practice talking about yourself and your work. You never know where it might lead.

Yours,
Chris

4th Annual AIGA Portfolio Review – Albany, Rochester, Syracuse – Register today!

March 1, 2012#

Letter from the President – March 2012

I’ve been fortunate to work with many remarkably generous and dedicated people who have volunteered their time and talents to strengthen our Chapter.

In the coming months, the Board will focus on important initiatives in the area of succession planning and the call for nominations to the AIGA Upstate New York Board of Directors. The Chapter nominating committee, chaired by Sarah Burns (Vice President), is seeking nominations to be submitted by Monday April 2, 2012.

February marks my 20th month as President of the Chapter, and I’m very proud of our team and of our accomplishments. My goal during the remaining of my two-year term is to continue to carry out the mission of our organization; to stimulate thinking about design, demonstrate the value of design, and empower the success of design professionals across the arc of their careers.

It takes a great deal of energy to maintain a Chapter. I am deeply appreciative of your ongoing support of our efforts. It has been a pleasure and privilege to work with each and every member of the Board and an honor to serve the statewide design community of New York. I’m happy to report that today our chapter is financially strong, we will meet our chapter affiliation requirements, and continues to enjoy steady membership growth.

Yours,
Chris

February 1, 2012#

Letter from the President – February 2012

Thanks to the team at Adobe, the New York State of Design competition has three (3) copies of Adobe CS5.5 Design Premium (valued at $1,899 ea.) to giveaway to three lucky designers. To enter, simply follow the instructions below.

And just think how awesome it would be to upgrade to Photoshop® CS5 Extended, Illustrator® CS5, InDesign® CS5.5, Dreamweaver® CS5.5, Flash® Professional CS5.5, Flash Catalyst® CS5.5, Fireworks® CS5, Acrobat® X Pro, Bridge CS5, Device Central CS5.5, bringing your creative ideas to life in a variety of media including smartphones and tablets.

THE NEW YORK STATE OF DESIGN DEADLINE HAS BEEN EXTENDED! Entries due Friday, February 17, 2011.

For further information about Adobe Corporate or Product join Adobe on Facebook or Adobe Students or on Twitter @adobe.

HOW TO ENTER

Download the Entry Form and get ready to fill in the blanks.

  1. 1. Get your entry fee ready: it’s $25 per entry if you’re an AIGA member, $50 if you’re not (p.s. it’s not too late to become a member, click here).
  2. 2. You’ll need to include 3 Entry Forms;
    1) save one interactive .pdf file to your CD/DVD, 2) attach one copy to the back of the mounted entry, and 3) include one with your entry fee payment.
  3. 3. Mount your original work or just send us your work – we’ll mount it for you – FREE!
  4. 4. Provide high resolution files and entry form .pdf on CD/DVD
  5. 5. Ship your entry to: AIGA Upstate New York, Chris Goldan, 137 East Ave., Suite 201
    Rochester, NY 14604

Do you have more questions? See our FAQ.

DOWNLOAD AN ENTRY FORM

January 1, 2012#

Letter from the President – January 2012

NEW YORK STATE OF DESIGN:
AIGA Upstate New York celebrates NY Design Communications

I want to invite you to join the hundreds of creative professionals who have been part of our chapter for over two decades. The goal of this competition is to spotlight areas of growth and opportunity for graphic designers, recognizing the best work being done, and emphasize the value of design to business and society, culminating in an opening exhibit and an accompanying catalog.

This competition celebrates design communications, of course, but more importantly, the power of AIGA Upstate New York – our ability to advance our profession, coming together for one night, and forge new relationships with one another.

NEW YORK STATE OF DESIGN strives to produce more than a collection of beautiful work, asking all entrants “why is this an example of excellent design?” Each entry into the exhibit is required to submit a brief description underscoring the relationship between their design and their client’s goals.

The call for entries extends to the entire state, open to members and non-members, individuals, and businesses. The only requirement – you must reside in New York.

Please join us for what will surely be a beautiful experience.

Yours,
Chris

Questions? Email me president@upstatenewyork.aiga.org

December 1, 2011#

Letter from the President – December 2011

You say tomato, I say in-house design.

A significant percentage of our design community work in-house at large corporations. HOW Magazine April 2008 issue featured a survey of readers. Here’s what they found.

46% Solo design practice or full-time freelance business
17% Graphic design firm
31% In-house design department

The fundamental principles of design communication remain constant regardless of organization size and expertise, or computing system. However, within larger organizations, the act of applying these principles, the ability to produce quality design communications, and overall job satisfaction are challenging at times. Learning how to hone your technical skills, or more importantly your soft skills, to effectively maneuver the politics and red tape that are common at larger organizations is often difficult and overlooked.

In my opinion, we’re a little late in focusing on in-house design, and I’m excited to take a shot at addressing it.

But I’d like your help. What can you add?

We’re going to conduct an online survey of AIGA Upstate New York’s approximately 300 members and 500 friends. Our goal is to identify designers and gather information to assist in developing programming specific to their needs.

Join us in January for In the House, when leaders of three successful Kodak in-house design departments – Product Design, Web Design, and Social Media – will share their experiences and talk about how their teams work, what they love about their jobs, where unique challenges lie, and how working for an internal client is both similar to and different from the client-studio/agency relationship. A members-only Q+A session will follow the presentation.

To register for the event, visit this link: http://inthehouse.eventbrite.com/

Email me your reaction to this letter, or post something to our Facebook page. Simply put, your participation goes to the core of many of our activities and assumptions; we cannot help but pay it some mind.

Have a safe and enjoyable holiday season!

Yours,
Chris

November 1, 2011#

Letter from the President – November 2011

Many of you may already dispense mentor-like encouragement and advice. Take the next step, be recognized for your contributions, become a mentor in the AIGA UPSTNY MNTR program.

On January 30, 2012, the AIGA Upstate New York is launching a mentoring program — AIGA UPSTNY MNTR. The program is a statewide initiative designed to connect emerging graphic designers with established design professionals in mentoring relationships, encouraging the future success of the design industry in New York.

Propelled by the expertise and advice of established professionals, mentees who participate in AIGA UPSTNY MNTR will further their knowledge of the business of design and the establishing of career goals. Both Mentees and Mentors will learn and grow together.

A compact, four-month program ending in April 2012, the UPSTNY MNTR program is intended to be a benefit of membership for those who will soon be entering our profession, welcomes current student members and recent graduates, as well as Member & Non-Member professionals.

If you’d like to be involved and aren’t a member, you can join now or get info on membership at http://www.aiga.org/join/

Mentors & Mentees: The last day to register is Dec. 23, 2011.

Hurry, space is limited. Click here for more information.

Yours,
Chris

October 1, 2011#

Letter from the President – October 2011

Programming for Hubs – bring an event to your city.

Feedback from chapter membership has been overwhelming – you want more event/programming in your city/Hub.

Our chapter is committed to supporting events/programming throughout our statewide chapter and feels strongly that members should, as much as possible, be involved in programming their own AIGA Hub events.

Consequently, we’ve developed Programming for Hubs, one of our 2011-2012 initiatives, a new approach to chapter programming/events, where we disperse funds to Hubs based upon membership numbers in each hub.

We at AIGA Upstate New York purposefully steer away from the traditional model, one of being the chapter’s exclusive planners. We try to avoid the “we’ll tell you what’s best” approach to Hub planning. You know what topics are trending in your community, which venues are preferred, and which sponsors are ripe for picking. We prefer to let the positive potential embodied in your new ideas and your energy propel the agenda. This approach requires your approval and participation. Participation can come in many forms.

It’s easy to find a way to participate in AIGA. Attend and let colleagues know about the CMYK series occurring in six (6) cities throughout the state. Become a vital part of our team by volunteering for an upcoming events/program; student portfolio workshop, in the house event with Kodak, mentor, and design competition.

Send me your reaction to this letter, email, social media, or post something to our Facebook page.

Yours,
Chris

September 1, 2011#

Letter from the President – September 2011

NEW YORK STATE OF DESIGN:
AIGA Upstate New York celebrates the best Communication Design!

The first AIGA Upstate New York statewide competition, show and accompanying catalog will highlight professional communication design work in New York, and showcase the state of design throughout New York. The call for entries will extend to the entire state, open to members and non-members, individuals, and businesses. The only requirement – you must reside in New York.

Why have we decided to do this? With 240+ members from Lake Placid to Fredonia, Horseheads to Oswego, we want something that will bring us all together. A bi-annual show will diversify programming and opportunities for the community, while providing the chapter greater exposure and volunteers the experience of supporting such an involved event.

The NEW YORK STATE OF DESIGN strives to produce more than a collection of beautiful work. Our aim is to illuminate measurable commercial junctions between business and design and reduce the ambiguity with design solutions, asking all entrants “why is this an example of excellent design?” Each entry into the show will be required to submit a brief description underscoring the relationship between their design and their client’s goals.

It doesn’t just look nice, there’s a problem being solved. As an inaugural design show, the AIGA acknowledges that in some quarters this conversation is just beginning. Though the show could be conceived in numerous manifestations, much will be gleaned about why design is an essential business tool and what the most effective design thinking looks like. Our hope is as you review this show, you will ask why the work was effective, how your work can achieve excellence, or how your business could benefit from successful design.

“Volunteering will save your career (or put you in a new one)” – Fast Company. This will not come into being easily. Volunteers are a critical part of our upcoming design exhibit.

Become a vital part of our creative team of volunteers and our statewide movement. Interested? Just send an e-mail for more information.

Yours,
Chris

August 1, 2011#

Letter from the President – August 2011

National + Local Retreat
Three Upstate New York board members attended the national AIGA Leadership Retreat – titled “Activate” – in Minneapolis, MN in early June. More than 250 leaders from across AIGA – chapter board members, national board members, and staff – came together with the goal of sharing chapter success stories, learning through breakout sessions & case studies, and networking with other AIGA members. Charged with gathering information and spreading the word about the vitality of the design community in Upstate New York, your colleagues would be glad to debrief you on Activate. Just click on their name and send an e-mail for more information: Chris Goldan (President), Sarah Burns (Vice President), and Jonathan La Plante (Communications Director).

Subsequently, board members, volunteers, and members attended the local AIGA Upstate New York Chapter Retreat in Geneva, NY for one-day in late June. Thirteen members from across New York State – professionals and student – came together to formulate a strategy for the 2011/2012 year – Chapter Initiatives. They include the following:

2011-2012 Chapter Initiatives
1) Student Programming Initiative – Provide programming that focus on student experience
a) Education Support – Fall 2011
b) Portfolio Workshop – Fall 2011
c) Mentoring Program – Winter/Spring 2012
d) Portfolio Review – Spring 2012

2) Professional Programming Initiative – Programming focused on Professionals, Associates, and Faculty experience
a) CMYK: Come Meet Your Kind – a renewed commitment to our monthly social
b) Programming for Hubs – Disperse funds to Hubs based upon membership numbers in each hub

3) Statewide Design Show Spring 2012

New Leadership + New Opportunities
New to the Board of Directors (BoD) is Rachel Jenks who will be overseeing CMYK: Come Meet Your Kind. New Coordinators are Andrew Cardish (Albany CMYK) and Aray Montalvan (Albany Membership). Alli McAuley is stepping aside to enjoy her newborn baby girl, Freya. Doug Bartow is slide over to Albany Event Coordinator. Allyson Van Houten is sliding over to Albany Education Coordinator. Vice President Sarah Burns will oversee Programming/Events, with primary responsibility for contacting our most active members in each Hub to let them know how much money has been allocated for programming. Any money made from events will be kept in that Hubs “kitty” for the remainder of the programming year. Hopefully this will encourage other cities to get involved.

Let’s talk! I encourage you to contact me if you would like to discuss any of this Update in detail.

Words can’t express how motivated I am about both this year and the future of AIGA Upstate New York. I look forward to working with you, and thank you for the opportunity to serve.

Yours,
Chris

May 1, 2011#

Letter from the President – May 2011

Call for Nominations to the AIGA Upstate New York Board
The AIGA Upstate New York Chapter nominating committee, chaired by Chris Goldan (President) and Sarah Burns (Vice President), is seeking nominations to be submitted by Friday, June 10, 2011. We encourage every AIGA member to consider nominating candidates for the AIGA Upstate New York board of directors. Self-nomination is permitted. These next few years will be critical to how we achieve our members’ ambitions for the Chapter and implement the AIGA Mandate for 2014.

The committee is determined to make sure member interests are represented in the nominations of board leadership. Committed people who are involved or are needed for a specific chapter need will be nominated for continuation; those who are not involved will not be nominated. This applies to outgoing board members as well.

Several seats are open. The process for nominations is simple: send the position title you are interested in to Chris Goldan atpresident@upstatenewyork.aiga.org. Nominations may be submitted by the nominee or by others on his or her behalf. If you are nominated by another, the board will notify you of this honor to ensure your acceptance. Position responsibilities can be seen below.

AIGA Upstate New York Board Members are volunteers elected by our membership to lead and direct our Chapter, communicate with and grow our membership and build an active creative community by plan and implement events. Directors serve two-year terms and comprise our Board of Directors. Coordinator positions serve one-year terms. Board meetings are once a month.

April 1, 2011#

Letter from the President – April 2011

2:00 minutes left on the clock…. you are wiped out…. and awaiting graduation.

Dear Graduating Graphic Design Students,

I appreciate you have had a considerable amount of feedback in the development and completion of your portfolio. However, at this point, it’s not what you know, but who you know.

Assuming your ultimate goal is to gain employment following graduation, your main reasons in showing your portfolio this Thursday are as follows:

  • network with professionals;
  • have a potential employer become familiar with your work;
  • practice your interview skills; and,
  • get valuable feedback from local professionals. That feedback can be on issues ranging from how best to present your portfolio to whom that person knows in Boston, MA.

Worry less about whether the professional reviewing your portfolio works here in Rochester or in NYC. Worry more about learning whom that person knows. Many of the professionals participating in AIGA’s portfolio review have hundreds of connects along the east coast, not to mention throughout AIGA. Wouldn’t it be nice to have access to those contacts? Professionals are more likely to vouch for graduate they know well, and history shows students who participate in AIGA events build relationships with professionals who are willing to work on their behalf.

It’s not too late. Make the most of your time at the upcoming portfolio review and other events, meet as many people as possible, and take business cards or copies of your resume along. You never know where it might lead.

Yours,
Chris

AIGA Portfolio reviews are this Thursday, CMYKs are next Wednesday. http://upstatenewyork.aiga.org/events

March 1, 2011#

Letter from the President – March 2011

Advice for Graduating Design Students
Many of you have started your last semester of school before graduating. My last semester of school seems like a lifetime ago. It started with these words from my Dad –

“Next time you come home, you’ll be a guest.”

Safe to say I took portfolio day very seriously. I refined my work, resume, and business cards, i.e . like the rest of my classmates, I prepared. Portfolio day came and went, and I walked out with three good leads… and returned to Rochester. I sent each lead a follow-up letter, thanking them for expressing interest ,and then rested — assured that I was on my way. The only phone calls that followed were my Dad’s …nearly everyday …“So, what have you done today to find a job.”

I started a relentless telephone campaign.

I called Dave from Ernst & Young in Cleveland, OH. His voicemail mentioned he would be in Italy for two months. Funny, he didn’t mention this when we met. Undeterred, I left a message… which was never returned. I called again, but this time when the receptionist asked who I was calling for, I explained my situation, that I needed to get a hold of Dave. The receptionist put me in touch with Dave’s assistant, who gave me Dave’s number in Italy. I called Dave in Italy and left a message. I was proud to tell my folks of my progress. I didn’t expect my Dad to respond incredulously,“ You called where?”

The good news – Dave called me back. Bad news – Dave was not the person I had met at portfolio review.  Long story short, I had been given the wrong business card. Dave would help me figure out who I had met, and eventually put me in touch with the correct person. In the end, EY flew me out to Cleveland which eventually led to the start of my professional career.

It all began at portfolio review, and took calling Italy to get the job.

My advice:

  • Be prepared to do what others aren’t willing to do.
  • Expand your search area, say between Boston and Charlotte, promise to come back with the knowledge you gleam.
  • Hit’em with all you’ve got, design a campaign for yourself, carefully crafting each touch, snail mailing or emailing are fine, call if you dare , but you better know how to work the phones, all supported by your website of course.
  • Be persistent.
  • Put your AIGA membership to good use, call on a professional member, free advice and connections are often available, dispensed over email, phone, coffee before 8am, during lunch, or after 6pm.
  • And most important – your portfolio needs to be a true reflection of you and your capabilities, not your instructors, your roommate, your former boss or co-workers.

Stay focused and undeterred.

Yours,
Chris